Russia seeks to become a hydrogen exporter
Russia plans in the future to become a supplier of hydrogen and will also export technology related to hydrogen production, Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak said in an interview.

“All this has been quite expensive so far, but we believe that just like with the renewable energy

sources, prices will go down over time, which will determine the pace of hydrogen adoption,” Novak

told the British daily The Guardian.

“To put it briefly, we can produce hydrogen and use it, as well as deliver it to consumers. We can also

export the hydrogen production technologies.”

At the same time, Russia had no intention of reducing hydrocarbon production, Novak said. It would

place its emphasis on gas as, according to ministry estimates, consumption of gas would rise in the near

future, notwithstanding plans by European countries to reduce their carbon footprint.

To achieve this, the minister said, Russia had to develop technology on carbon dioxide capture.

“I believe natural gas to be an eco-friendly energy source,” Novak told the daily. “We believe that the

share of natural gas in the global energy mix will only increase. We believe this to apply not only to

Europe, but globally too.”

Novak said that by 2035 Russia could boost annual gas production to 1 trillion cubic metres. At the

same time, he said, exports of LNG would also grow more than fourfold – to 120-140 million tonnes a

year from current levels of 29 million tonnes. Shipments of gas by pipeline would also remain at high

levels.

Share:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on telegram
Telegram
Share on email
Email
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on vk
VK
Share on odnoklassniki
OK
Share on reddit
Reddit

Add comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Central Asian climate undergoes irreversible change

By measuring the width, colour and other properties of the rings, researchers said the climate in Central Asia was altered in irreversible fashion against a background of constant heat waves in the 1990s.The unprecedented rise in average temperatures over the years led to a ripple of repetitive processes of drying out the soil – which contributed to a rise in temperatures.

read more ...

Archives


November 2020
M T W T F S S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30